Rhineland-Palatinate and Saarland, Germany

Rhineland-Palatinate and Saarland, Germany

Europe
Rhineland-Palatinate The state of Rhineland-Palatinate is located in the southwest region Germany, of which Mainz is the state capital. In the federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate, the Rhenish Slate Mountains and part of the Eifel and Hunsrück extend. Vacationers areas in the western Westerwald and the north-western part of the Taunus, which is also located in Rhineland-Palatinate, are also popular. Landscapes in Rhineland-Palatinate Rhineland-Palatinate borders on North Rhine-Westphalia, Hesse and Baden-Württemberg. It is also bounded in the south by the French region of Alsace. Also Lorraine and Saarland bordering Rhineland-Palatinate. In addition, the State informed the excellent wines a border with Luxembourg Grevenmacher and Diekrich and the Belgian Wallonia. Rhineland-Palatinate is very rich in water. The Rhine, Moselle, Saar and Lahn run through the area. The Nahe, Sauer, Our, Glan and…
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Middle German Dialects

Middle German Dialects

Europe
Central German includes the West and East Central German dialects. The border between West and East Central German, which is characterized by the shifting of an initial Germanic »p« to »f« (e.g. in »pund« versus »fund« for »pound«) runs over between Fulda and Werra the Rhön. West Central German is divided into Middle Franconian (with Lower Franconian, Ripuarian and Moselle Franconian), Rhine Franconian, North, East and Central Hesse; East Central German includes the dialect groups Thuringian, Upper Saxon, North Upper Saxon, Südmärkisch, Silesian and High Prussian. West Central German: The Low Franconian (Niederrheinisch, Kleverländisch) marks the transition from High German to Low German. While vocalism features characteristics of High German (e.g. monophthonging from äi (ei) to e and from ou to o before r, h, w and in the final), consonantism is very close to Low German,…
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German Language Research Institutions

German Language Research Institutions

Europe
Germany: In addition to the German university institutes, two institutions deal with research into the German language: the "Institute for German Language" (IDS) in Mannheim (founded in 1964; publishes, among other things, the series of publications "Language of the Present" as well as the magazines "Deutsche Sprache" and "Sprachreport «Out) and the» Society for German Language «(GfdS) in Wiesbaden (here since 1965; founded in 1947 in Lüneburg as a successor organization to the German Language Association founded in 1885; maintains [2005] 62 branch associations in 20 countries; publishes the magazines» Mutterssprache «and »The Language Service«; has chosen the »Words of the Year« since 1971). The Goethe-Institut in Munich (founded in 1932, rebuilt in 1952) is dedicated to cultivating the German language and culture abroad. which (2004) has 128 branches in 79…
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Berlin Wall Part II

Berlin Wall Part II

Europe
Order to shoot and victims of the Berlin Wall Anyone wishing to visit the eastern part of the city after the wall was built now needed a special permit. There were also strict regulations for leaving East Berlin heading west. After the Berlin Wall was built, the GDR leadership also fortified the 1,400-kilometer border with the Federal Republic. It was here that the dreaded "death strips" were created, which were supposed to make it impossible to cross the border. In parallel with the border, mines were laid and self-firing systems were installed. On August 22, 1961, the leadership of the GDR had already passed a "resolution to use the weapon". The border guards were obliged to shoot anyone who tried to cross the border without a permit. Many citizens of…
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Berlin Wall Part I

Berlin Wall Part I

Europe
The Berlin Wall was a strictly guarded military system of the GDR along the border around West Berlin that existed from 1961 to 1989/90. On June 15, 1961, the head of state of the German Democratic Republic (GDR), Walter Ulbricht, told journalists: "Nobody has any intention of building a wall." The question was whether the GDR had its border with West Berlin want to close. A short time later, however, it became clear that Ulbricht had lied. Because on August 13, 1961, the government of the GDR left Berlin seal off the sector boundary. Until then, Berlin had been the last open "eye of the needle" for all people who wanted to leave the GDR, because the zone border between East and West Germany had been sealed off since 1954.…
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Wismar History

Wismar History

Europe
Germany is an underrated destination! For those who take the time to visit this country, there is much to experience in the form of cultural experiences but also magnificent nature experiences, fine beaches in the north, beautiful wine districts and high mountains in the south. In October, I made my second visit to Germany in 2017 with a focus on visiting cities with World Heritage-listed city centers. During the first trip I visited the cities of Quedlinburg and Goslar as well as the mines in Rammelsberg. During the second trip, I visited the two former Hanseatic and Swedish cities Wismar and Stralsund. Both times I drove to the destinations. During the second trip I drove from Gothenburg to Trelleborg from where I took the ferry to Rostock. In Rostock I…
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SPEYER ATTRACTIONS

SPEYER ATTRACTIONS

Europe
At the Technology Museum, it is possible to yawn inside a real submarine. The handsome cathedral is a World Heritage Site The nearly thousand-year-old Speyer Cathedral has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1981. It is the largest surviving Romanesque church in the world. There is space inside for a total of 2,000 people. What is special is that such a huge cathedral was built at a time when the whole town of Speyer had only five hundred inhabitants. The builder of the church, Emperor Konrad II, wanted to show his power and authority in impressive proportions. Over the centuries, a total of eight German emperors and kings have been buried in connection with the church. Speyer Cathedral is open to visitors daily. There is no entrance fee, but…
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